Women’s Health Data: Education

Educational attainment is a predictive measure for future income and better economic conditions for women. Education impacts on employment and income opportunities, and provides the skills and knowledge necessary to improve health needs and access to appropriate service providers. In highlighting education as a determinant of health, the World Health Organization, identifies gender inequality as limiting women’s access to basic education and educational resources.


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Key statistics


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women


Women from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds


Women with disabilities


Same-sex attracted women


References

  1. World Economic Forum, The Global Gender Gap Report 2013. Geneva, World Economic Forum, 2013 [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.weforum.org/issues/global-gender-gap.
  2. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Gender Indicators, Australia, Jan 2013. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2013. - (Cat. No. 4125.0) [cited 11 September 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4125.0~Jan%202013~Main%20Features~Contents~1.
  3. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Education and Work, Australia, May 2012. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2012. – (Cat. No. 6227.0) [cited 9 October 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/6227.0Main+Features1May%202012?OpenDocument.
  4. Norton A. Mapping Australian higher education, 2013 version. Carlton, Vic: Grattan Institute; 2013 [cited 9 October 2013] Available from: http://grattan.edu.au/publications/reports/post/mapping-australian-higher-education-2013/.
  5. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Social Trends 2006: Boy’s schooling. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2006. – (Cat. No. 4102.0) [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4102.02006?OpenDocument.
  6. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Social Trends, Sep 2012, Education differences between men and women. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2012. - (Cat. no. 4120.0) [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main+Features20Sep+2012#INTRODUCTION.
  7. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Labour Force Characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, Estimates from the Labour Force Survey, 2011. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2012. – (Cat. No. 6287) [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6287.0/.
  8. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Characteristics of Recent Migrants, Australia, Nov 2010. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2011. – (Cat. no. 6250.0) [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Products/6250.0~Nov+2010~Main+Features~Education?OpenDocument.
  9. Graduate Careers Australia. GradStats 2012: employment and salary outcomes for recent higher education graduates. Melbourne: Graduate Careers Australia; 2013. [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.graduatecareers.com.au/research/researchreports/gradstats/.
  10. Dyson S, Mitchell A, Smith A, Dowsett G, Pitts M, Hillier L. Don’t ask, don’t tell: hidden in the crowd: the need for documenting links between sexuality and suicidal behaviours among young people. Melbourne: Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society; 2003 [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.glhv.org.au/node/280.
  11. Pitts M, Smith A, Mitchell A, Patel S. Private lives: a report on the health and wellbeing of GLBTI Australians. Melbourne: Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society; 2007. [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.glhv.org.au/node/412.
  12. Hillier L, Jones T, Monagle M, Overton N, Gahan L, Blackman J, et al. Writing themselves in 3: the third national study on the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people. Melbourne: Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society; 2010. [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.glhv.org.au/node/657.
  13. Hillier L, Turner A, Mitchell A. Writing themselves in again: 6 years on. Melbourne: Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society; 2005 [cited 5 November 2013] Available from: http://www.glhv.org.au/node/69.

Published: February 2014


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